yasminwithane:

I made a bookmark!

Didn’t turn out exactly as I had hoped, but….yeah.

I’ll probably make a Hank version soon to join in. :)

(via tfiosmovienews)



(via tfios-moviee)


Oh, look, it’s Ansel Elgort who plays Gus in The Fault in our Stars and whose world view involves a great deal of shirtlessness, and, frankly, who among us can blame him?

(via tfios-lovers)



Think my name’s funny, do you? No need to ask you yours. Red hair, and a hand-me-down robe? You must be a Weasley.

(via mugglenet)


tyleroakley:

troylered:

Please watch it.

So disgusting.


tommarvalo:

gif battle | vs forgottenrememberall
round one • bruised and battered

(via mugglenet)


Malfoy is derived from the French “mal foi”, meaning “badly faith” or “unfaithful”. In law, “bad faith” refers to a case in which a malicious motive on the part of a party in a lawsuit undermines their case. This would be relevant to the general cruel natures displayed by Lucius and Draco as well as Narcissa. In existentialism, “bad faith” is a philosophical concept in which people blame their own failures on external factors, thus denying responsibility for their actions. Also, this most likely refers to the Malfoys’ tendency to switch their loyalties to avoid danger or punishment, rather than steadfastly supporting their presented views.

(via mugglenet)



The best piece of advice I ever received

fishingboatproceeds:

came from my friend Lindsay Robertson: “If you’re gonna be a band, make sure it’s called The Yaysayers.”


hollandoroden:

*KICKS DOWN YOUR DOOR*

DO NOT

*PULLS YOU OUT OF BED*

TALK SHIT

*THROWS YOU ACROSS ROOM*

ABOUT AUGUSTUS WATERS 

(via tfiosmovienews)


tfios-changed-my-life:

So this little cigarette right here has sparked a whole new brand of TFiOS hate, much of which is coming from people who claimed to love the book. 
Many people are now pointing out how “pretentious” Augustus is, and I can’t help but think, You’re only just now realizing this. He was written to be a seemingly pretentious and arrogant person. The acknowledgement of this is actually highly important because, without it, the book loses the message that a hero’s journey is that of strength to weakness. 
Augustus Waters has big dreams for himself. He wants to be known and remembered; he wants to be a hero; he wants to be seen as perfect. But there’s already something standing in his way… He has a disability, and society tells him that a person cannot be both perfect and disabled. So what does he do? He creates a persona for himself. He tries to appear older and wiser than he is. But the pretentious side of him is NOT who he truly is. It’s all an act. (This is evident in the fact that he often uses words in the wrong context.)
And when his cancer returns, we begin to see his mask cracking. The true Augustus begins to bleed through… Hazel even takes notice of this from time to time. And by the time we get to the gas station scene, Augustus is no longer the picture of perfection he was when we met him. The play has been canceled. The actor must reveal himself. And he’s revealed to be a weak, defenseless boy, succumbing to the cancer that is made of him. 
THE PRETENTIOUSNESS IS INTENTIONAL. It stands to show Augustus’s journey from flawless to flawed, from strong to weak. It’s the key to understanding that Augustus was the hero he always wanted to be, even if he didn’t realized it. 

tfios-changed-my-life:

So this little cigarette right here has sparked a whole new brand of TFiOS hate, much of which is coming from people who claimed to love the book. 

Many people are now pointing out how “pretentious” Augustus is, and I can’t help but think, You’re only just now realizing this. He was written to be a seemingly pretentious and arrogant person. The acknowledgement of this is actually highly important because, without it, the book loses the message that a hero’s journey is that of strength to weakness

Augustus Waters has big dreams for himself. He wants to be known and remembered; he wants to be a hero; he wants to be seen as perfect. But there’s already something standing in his way… He has a disability, and society tells him that a person cannot be both perfect and disabled. So what does he do? He creates a persona for himself. He tries to appear older and wiser than he is. But the pretentious side of him is NOT who he truly is. It’s all an act. (This is evident in the fact that he often uses words in the wrong context.)

And when his cancer returns, we begin to see his mask cracking. The true Augustus begins to bleed through… Hazel even takes notice of this from time to time. And by the time we get to the gas station scene, Augustus is no longer the picture of perfection he was when we met him. The play has been canceled. The actor must reveal himself. And he’s revealed to be a weak, defenseless boy, succumbing to the cancer that is made of him. 

THE PRETENTIOUSNESS IS INTENTIONAL. It stands to show Augustus’s journey from flawless to flawed, from strong to weak. It’s the key to understanding that Augustus was the hero he always wanted to be, even if he didn’t realized it. 

(via tfiosmovienews)


itsvondell:

laurakvstheworld:

yepperoni:

i think about the 3d printed spider robot dancing to salsa a lot and im not sure if it’s because of the music or if it’s because of the hypnotizing dance moves
most likely both 

this is the best thing ive ever seen in my whole life

oh my god…. i was feeling down and this absolutely 100% lifted me out of it. oh my god!!!! i love him!!!!!

(via tyleroakley)